Best of Layton Utah Award

Medical Certification.com Receives 2016 Best of Layton Award Layton Award Program Honors the Achievement LAYTON May 18, 2016 — Medical Certification has been selected for the 2016 Best of Layton Award in the Education category by the Layton Award Program. Each year, the Layton Award Program identifies companies that we believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the Layton area a great place to live, work and play. Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2016 Layton Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the Layton Award Program and data provided by third...

Medical Error Deaths Increasing

Research shows that medical error deaths are right behind heart disease and cancer.  With the emphasis on improving all of the elements of patient care, it has been determined that errors in the outpatient management of care often aren’t easily found.  For instance, prescriptions some 4 billion a year and rapidly growing, are a main contributor in the error process. Aside from the risk of allergy with a new medication, medication errors are frequent and common.  Technology is used to crosscheck but it is far from perfect.  Dosage is critical and a slight mistake in creating the record makes a huge difference. Within the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), the Division of Medication Error Prevention and Analysis (DMEPA) reviews medication error reports on marketed human drugs including prescription drugs, generic drugs, and over-the-counter drugs.  DMEPA uses the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCCMERP) definition of a medication error.  Specifically, a medication error is “any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm while the medication is in the control of the health care professional, patient, or consumer.  Such events may be related to professional practice, health care products, procedures, and systems, including prescribing; order communication; product labeling, packaging, and nomenclature; compounding; dispensing; distribution; administration; education; monitoring; and use.” Additionally, DMEPA prospectively reviews proprietary names, labeling, packaging, and product design prior to drug approval to help prevent medication errors. DMEPA publishes recommendations on common areas of error, for instance, error-prone abbreviations – visit this page to review: http://www.ismp.org/tools/errorproneabbreviations.pdf“>   And the official DO NOT USE List of Abbreviations...

Health Care by Smart Phone

We often discuss and write about the future of medicine and report technological advances. With the many years of experience in the medical field, the mind-boggling advances in technology are simply incredible. The problems are still many, regulatory, reimbursement complexities, horribly expensive screening tests to establish diagnoses and treatment plans, the overworked physician trying to provide good patient care and struggling with the problems of coping with EMR (electronic medical records), to say nothing of the huge expense of medical care in the U.S. Well, there’s a light in the tunnel that may change everything: SMART PHONES!!! Take the time to watch the video and tell us what you think. If you are as amazed as we are, tell everybody you know. Take charge of your health with INFORMATION!!! Watch it: Health Care by Smart...

EHR Frustration Continues

EHR FRUSTRATION Though the goals for Electronic Medical Records (EHRs) were commendable, the results have been awful. The objectives were to improve medical provider communication and share patient information. Providers have spent a ton of money trying to make them work, but so far it’s just created expense and frustration, and, in fact probably reduced the quality of medical care. The CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) added to the headache with mandates to use EHRs, and initiated the “Meaningful Use” program, but the AMA and many other state and county medical associations have challenged the timelines and their stages. CMS recently issued some final and proposed regulations for stages 2 and 3 of meaningful use in response. Though something like 80% of physicians adopted some form of an EHR, the results are dismal. Lots of them are so disgusted, they do not plan to continue their use, willing to accept financial penalties imposed by CMS. Providers hoped EHRs would provide the tools to improve patient care with the ability to exchange information and allow better tools for planning. Instead, the systems won’t talk to each, cost a lot to maintain, slow down the actual patient encounter process, and seriously impact cash flow. With so much competition in the vendor market, the expectation is that software systems will get better and the best ones will rise to the top, so providers are now waiting for that process to unfold. They don’t want to get it wrong a second time. Hopefully, in spite of the setbacks and costs, technology will ultimately be an integral part of patient care and...

Baby Boomers and Healthcare Jobs

Hard to believe but the Baby Boomers reached retirement age in 2011.  Having officially joined the aging population, more medical care is required, thus more healthcare workers.  Because of the significant increase, the industry is looking at where they will recruit the new workers since so many of the older ones will be retiring. For those who think they are over the hill, there is good news — it’s pretty much a foregone conclusion that workers 50 or over will be used because of their experience and the willingness to actually work.  AARP reports that 35% of the U.S. labor force will be 50 or older by 2022, an increase of 10%. Since older workers have largely been discriminated against, that’s great news.  Somewhere along the line, it was determined that older workers cost more and were not as productive, which of course was totally off the charts misinformation.  They are well known for their work ethic which is far more important in terms of productivity than what they might cost in insurance benefits. They are dependable and reliable, the last of the greatest generation along with the boomers.  The turnover is less too than the younger worker statistics. Companies are hiring older works and providing training programs as well. So, if you are an “older person,” don’t wait another minute to get trained for healthcare jobs.  A great place to start looking is www.med-certification.com where a variety of training is available at very affordable prices.  Just do...