Medical Billing Careers

If you are considering career training to becoming a medical biller, here’s some good information about the billing job description. SUMMARY OF BILLING OCCUPATIONAL EXPECTATIONS: A Medical Biller performs a variety of fairly simple to very complex clerical and accounting functions for patient billing, including verification of invoice information, maintenance of third party billing records, and resolution of a variety of problems. Follows up on submitted claims and patient billing; resubmits claims or resolves problems. May handle cash items and accounts receivable posting. May prepare accounting reports for a practice. DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: Processes billings to patients and third party reimbursement claims; maintains supporting documentation files and current patient addresses. Processes patient statements, keys data, posts transactions, and verifies accuracy of input to reports generated. Researches and responds by telephone and in writing to patient inquiries regarding billing issues and problems. Follows up on submitted claims; monitors unpaid claims, initiates tracers; resubmits claims as necessary. May receive and receipt cash items and third party reimbursements; posts and reconciles payments to patient ledgers. Balances daily batches and reports; prepares income reports and statistics; distributes reports. Maintains patient demographic information and data collection systems. Participates in development of organization procedures and update of forms and manuals. Performs a variety of general clerical duties, including telephone reception, mail distribution, and other routine functions. May assist in preparing documentation and responses for legal inquiries, litigation, and court appearances. Ensures strict confidentiality of financial records. Performs miscellaneous job-related duties as assigned. KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES REQUIRED: Ability to gather data, compile information, and prepare reports. Ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing....

Medical Billing Specialties Bring More Pay

You’ve made it.  You did your time to train for your career in medical billing.  You passed your exam, and now you have your first job.  But, why not take it to the next level? The amount of income paid in the field of medical billing varies based on location, type of specialty, and the institution, whether it’s a hospital, clinic, or an individual practitioner. Some of the various specialties are: Dentistry Chiropractics Gastroenterology Internal Medicine Pediatrics Anesthesia Orthopedics Neurology When you specialize in a particular specialty, you kind of become a specialist yourself and know more about how to handle the reimbursement process in that particular area of medical service. The more you know, the more you will likely earn. Proven talents and experience make you shine. Realistically, you have to start somewhere though.  Start with whatever is the best billing job you can get.  Learn from your experiences at it.  The time spent in any medical billing job will help you realize what aspects of the various medical services you are billing for you may or may not like. This can help you decide if or in what specialty you might like to work at. It’s a good idea and a smart move to look into certification. That tells employers that you know your stuff. Med-Certification.com provides both the training and the certification if you decide to pursue either. What are you waiting for?  Take your first step to getting trained in medical billing...

Medical Billing Compliance For Beginners

What is medical billing?  Medical billing is the process where the provider of services, a physician, hospital, or clinic, submits information to various payers to pay for the services rendered. There are lots of codes used that describe the diagnosis and the treatment. Once the codes are calculated, the insurance forms are transmitted digitally. The payer then reviews the information submitted and determines whether it is service covered by the patient’s insurance plan, and they then calculate how much they will pay. In the office, the billers are responsible to collect any co-payments. To help ensure accuracy with the process, medical compliance was initiated by CMA which handles Medicare and Medicaid. While accurate documentation of a patient’s health history and treatment is important, clinics and their physicians should be able to rely on staff to do the paperwork and be able to focus on patient care. Efficient medical billing staff allows the physician to be more effective at what s/he is trained to do. The staff keeps the clinic profitable by making sure all services are well documented, that claims are sent out timely, done accurately, making sure that the payer will find no reason not to pay. Then they track all of the elements related to the payments process and monitor late...

Outsource Medical Billing?

Medical Billing has become increasingly complex. As a result, many providers evaluate outsourcing. New law, HIPAA, requires the same standards and rules for outsourcing companies as it does for the providers. Other factors to consider about billing companies are: Do they have the best systems in place for billing and coding Since the billing company is an extension of the provider, will they be represented in a professional manner with patients and payers? What is the track record for receivables management Do they have certified coders on staff What kind of references do they provide With the advent of ICD-10 coding (2015), it is anticipated that more coders will be needed since it is likely both the old and the new codes will have to be used for some period of time so that the coder will actually be doing redundant coding, doubling the work. Experts say that many institutions will be seriously looking at outsourcing some or all of their coding. If a billing company does the job well, they have incentives to collect more revenue than the provider since they are most often paid on a percentage basis. It is their business to stay current with changes in government or private insurance policies, rules, and law. All things considered, it is often a better alternative than keeping the coding and billing in-house....

Medical Billing and Coding Introduction

Hospitals and medical practices benefit greatly from medical billing and coding.  For a medical practice to receive prompt payment from insurance companies it is important to streamline the claim process.  This is where medical billing and coding come in handy. Some facilities have in-house medical billing and coding employees, while other operations outsource them.  Regardless, medical billing and coding workers input data related to the following: patient records registration encounters appointments and scheduling followups electronic insurance claims claim denial followup insurance authorization account reconciliation coding and code verification reporting and much more. When a medical facility incorporates well trained personnel or contract services to provide medical billing and coding, it frees up physicians so they can spend more time caring for their patients.  When doctors and physicians do not have to deal with administrative tasks it keeps patients flowing, patient care more one-on-one, more patients may be seen, with an improved revenue picture. Not only do expert medical billers and coders increase profit margins, they also minimize loss.  Well trained staff employ better coding which prevents denied or challenged claims. As technology continues to advance, reduced paperwork is a big advantage.  Bill Gates himself said that he envisioned that offices may one day be “paperless.” Timeliness.  By electronically submitting streamlined and clean claims it expedites the processing and payment from insurance companies.  Quicker payments mean quicker profits for medical providers, losing much less over harder to recover receivables. Well trained staff are important whether employees, subcontractors, or outsource services. A newly emerging pro is the Medical...

Medical Billing is the Fastest Growing Opportunity in Health Care

On February 16, 2006 the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act was finalized, and enacted. This law was designed to establish national standards for all health care transactions, and to ensure the security and privacy of all health related information. The motivation behind this law is to improve the performance, and efficiency of our health care system. This type of reform increased the need for qualified individuals to assure full compliance, as well as create maximum reimbursement for providers. The proliferation of medical knowledge following World War II brought about an explosion of diagnostic, and treatment procedures. As a result, the need to organize and standardize all developing technologies.This is when the foundations of medical coding and billing were born. Medical coding met these challenges, and allowed for a more uniform way of communicating health information under a common language. Since improvements and refinements of medical procedures are constantly being developed, codes must be added and updated to reflect these changes. Today, the number of medical and surgical procedures have expanded remarkably and so have the codes to describe them. The most current version of the diagnostic codes, ICD10 are the newest version. The expertise required for a biller or coder has increased as well. The ability to do the work with the added complexities requires expanded training. med-certification.com provides that training. Best Job Opportunities: Medical Billing and related occupations continue to be the fastest growing opportunities in health care. Not only are jobs available in provider offices, but in insurance institutions and government agencies which are investing huge resources to control billing fraud, abuse, and establish some degree...